Leadership+Resilience

Insights

Give context, get motivation

When we give context we get motivation. 

Today I received an email about a recent fundraiser we donated to. The email did not ask for more money.

Instead, the organizer of the fundraiser got back in touch with the donors to tell us how the money has been spent so far. He listed the items they were able to purchase and provided color about how important those purchases were for the program.

I was floored.

I can count on one hand the number of times I have heard anything after giving money to a fundraiser or a nonprofit. Usually it’s radio silence until I get another solicitation to donate. 

Too many fundraisers are heavy on pitch but light on context. Similarly, too many of us are heavy on “what” and light on “why.”

Maybe we think the why is unnecessary. Maybe we don’t really know how to explain the why. Maybe it’s too much work. For whatever reason we are shy with why. 

The problem is that our motivation comes from the why surrounding the what. The why is what we act on.

Taking the time to give context is the best way to get motivation.

by Jonathan Wilson

Jonathan is the Head Coach at Sandcastle Company, a Seattle-based leadership training organization. His first book, Future Leader: Rebooting Leadership to Win the Millennial and Tech Future [link], is now available. Jonathan regularly writes and speaks about The New Leader Way, leadership resilience, and the future of work. He has years of leadership experience in both the public and private sectors, a master's degree from Seattle University, and professional coach training from the University of Miami.

Filed under: Leadership

Published on February 3, 2020

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